PNC Bank

Fahamu Pecou is an American visual artist and scholar known for producing works that combine aspects of Fine art and Hip-hop as commentary on Popular culture. Most of his works engage representations of black masculinity and identity. Fahamu describes his art this way "My art raises questions about the types of images and representations that come to inform contemporary readings and performances of Black male masculinity.

Ryan Kilgore - A native of Atlanta, has been playing the soulful sounds of the saxophone since age 10. He is a fourth generation sax player his grandfather, Ester Betterson, bought Ryan's first horn. He has worked with musical legends including Jimmy Jam and Terry Lewis as well as Stevie Wonder. Ryan has made cameo appearances in 20th Century Fox's Drumline, Paramount Pictures' Fighting Temptations, and Tyler Perry's Diary of a Mad Black Woman.

Ray Cornelius

Check out last weekend's edition of UPFRONT Inside Atlanta's Entertainment Industry. It features my red carpet interviews from the Super Bowl Gospel Celebration which aired recently on BET. I got a chance to chat briefly with a number of the show's performers and presenters including gospel greats: Kirk Franklin and Tasha Cobbs-Leonard, newcomer Koryn Hawthorne and Greenleaf star Deborah Joy Winans. 

The Local Take will host PNC Bank Second  Annual Black History Month Breakfast on Wednesday, February 28 at 7:30 a.m. at the Center for Civil and Human Rights.  This year the focus is on African American Athletes who succeeded on and off the field of play. Throughout February you can hear daily vignettes from PNC Bank on  Jazz 91.9 WCLK saluting Atlanta's African American athletes.   I talked about the salutes with PNC Regional President for Georgia, Eddie Meyers.

PNC Bank and Jazz 91.9 WCLK celebrate Atlanta's African American Business Leaders--Henry “Hank” James Thomas was born on August 29, 1941 in Jacksonville, Florida. He spent most of his childhood in St. Augustine. As a student at Howard University, Hank Thomas joined the first Freedom Rider group on May 4, 1961. On Mothers Day, when the  bus Thomas was riding on reached Anniston, Alabama, it was set on fire by the Ku Klux Klan. Ten days later Thomas rode from Montgomery to Jackson, Mississippi. There he was incarcerated at the notorious, Parchman State Prison Farm.

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